Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Sweet Sweet Springs

The welcoming committee this beautiful morning was a California Quail family, mom, dad and four tiny fledglings resembling walnuts with itty bitty legs.  Bird song filled the air.  I had Sweet Springs to myself.

Nuttall's Woodpecker, singing it's flight song, dashed between the trees.  Two Tree Swallow sped overhead in their relentless pursuit of insects.  House Sparrow brightened the semi-sunny morning with it’s cheerful chatter.
High in the canopy, Black-headed Grosbeak sang its little heart out; on the far side of the preserve an answering song could be heard.  (Unfortunately, too breezy to record the song.)
Dark-eyed Junco scratched in the leaf litter.  Four Mallards fed in a channel; I doubt they noticed the melodious song of the Black-headed Grosbeak.  Faithful Black Phoebe was flycatching from her usual perch on a fallen eucalyptus tree. (the channels empty when tides are low)
I experienced birding nirvana for about a half hour in Sweet Springs this morning.  Before I departed for home, I gently educated a pair of gentleman from Mohave who were convinced the Mallards were Northern Shovelers.

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Birding Dairy Creek

                   Dairy Creek Trail
 San Luis Obispo County, El Chorro Regional Park - A storm was brewing - cumulus clouds gathering, winds increasing in strength - A perfect morning on the Central Coast, and a perfect day to bird Dairy Creek.  The vegetation along the trickling creek (below) was thick with Oak, Willow, and California Bay -  dried young bay leaves can be used as flavoring (use sparingly).
 My first sighting was of six Canada Goose flying in the direction of Morro Bay.  A few moments later heard gobbling from a male Turkey, always a day brightener. 

Dense Stands of Coast Live Oak (Quercus agrifolia) cover the low hills (top photo).  Birds heard in the oaks and creek bed - Pacific-slope Flycatcher (heard frequently but never seen),  Wilson's Warbler (migrant), Bewick's Wren, Junco, Nuttall's Woodpecker, and a migrant Ash-throated Flycatcher (below).
 The Ash-throated Flycatcher is about the size of a robin (9-16).  Even at a distance it's bushy crest and pale grey (looks white at a distance) underparts, and smallish bill are recognizable.  In flight it's deep cinnamon tail and pale belly are very noticeable.  I believe the Ash-throated Flycatcher is well established along Dairy Creek.
About a mile up the creek, after crossing over a quaint, yet sturdy collapsed wooden bridge, the landscape opens into grasslands (above).  Waves of wind were rolling through the grass.   Ahead of me perched on a barbed wire fence were a pair of Western Bluebird and a Lark Sparrow.  The Lark Sparrow and the female Bluebird flew off and an Ash-throated Flycatcher landed on the wire.  When the flycatcher departed the scene, a perky looking California Towhee arrived.  In spite of the wind, I managed a fuzzy photo.  The male Bluebird is perched on the post, on the wire is the Towhee.  Notice the blackening sky, upper right.  
Time to begin the trek back.  I checked the wind velocity, gusts at 25mph, yikes!  Birding Dairy Creek on a windy day proved delightful.  Perhaps if I walk up the Creek about every two weeks I may get a sighting of fledglings perched on this popular barbed wire fence.  Now that would be a thrill!