Sunday, April 9, 2017

Wrentit - Extended Trill


        Hazard Canyon Wrentit Habitat
The male Wrentit song consists of a few sharp whistled "pit" notes with a descending 3-4 second trill at the end.  It is considered the classic sound of the Coastal Sage Scrub community. This week I hiked up Hazard canyon.  Wrentits were active and singing.  One Wrentit was defending his territory of blooming Hemlock from a persistent Anna's Hummingbird.  Every time the hummer hovered over a blossom, the Wrentit chased her off.  
 Wrentits are faithful to their territory, remaining in the same area for up to 12 years; they defend and define their territory by singing.  About a mile up the canyon I heard a Wrentit song with an extended trill.  Fortunately, he repeated it several times.  I felt his breathlessness, if that was possible.  His song was saying, in no uncertain terms, "This is my territory and you do not belong."  It is more than likely that his life mate was sitting on their nest.

The video consists of three segments. The photo of the Wren separates the segments. For comparison, the first and last segment are the usual song with a 2.83 sec. trill.  The middle segment has the extended 9.13 sec. trill.  When you are watching the video keep in mind that, as he trills, his tail is vigorously vibrating.     https://youtu.be/-pBjwCYZUwM

1 comment:

  1. Nice work, Joyce. That was a good review for me.

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