Sunday, April 9, 2017

Wrentit - Extended Trill

        Hazard Canyon Wrentit Habitat
The male Wrentit song consists of a few sharp whistled "pit" notes with a descending 3-4 second trill at the end.  It is considered the classic sound of the Coastal Sage Scrub community. This week I hiked up Hazard canyon.  Wrentits were active and singing.  One Wrentit was defending his territory of blooming Hemlock from a persistent Anna's Hummingbird.  Every time the hummer hovered over a blossom, the Wrentit chased her off.  
 Wrentits are faithful to their territory, remaining in the same area for up to 12 years; they defend and define their territory by singing.  About a mile up the canyon I heard a Wrentit song with an extended trill.  Fortunately, he repeated it several times.  I felt his breathlessness, if that was possible.  His song was saying, in no uncertain terms, "This is my territory and you do not belong."  It is more than likely that his life mate was sitting on their nest.

The video consists of three segments. The photo of the Wren separates the segments. For comparison, the first and last segment are the usual song with a 2.83 sec. trill.  The middle segment has the extended 9.13 sec. trill.  When you are watching the video keep in mind that, as he trills, his tail is vigorously vibrating.

Saturday, April 1, 2017

Birding Montaña de Oro - Sunday/Wednesday

Birding Montaña de Oro - Sunday/Wednesday

Islay Creek riparian habitat - Right, Islay Creek Road
left 2 mile loop Reservoir Flats Trail

Sunday - Islay Creek is located about 30-40 feet below a rough, unpaved road that follows the creek east for about 3 miles.  Due to the intense growth of Willows, Oak, Sycamore and native shrubbery, there are few places along the road where one is able to glimpse the water, much less see a tiny bird.

Since it was unlikely that I would see a bird in the creek, I identified the majority of them by sound - Birds heard but not seen were: Pacific Flycatcher, Golden-crowned Warbler, Wilson's Warbler (below), and Northern Flicker. Wilson's Warbler were numerous.  I was fortunate to see Mr. Wilson's as he flitted through a cluster of roadside Willow. 
  Wilson's Warbler - 3-5 inches, .30 ounces, is considered by Audubon, "Climate Threatened."

In the brush along the road were California Quail, Bewick's Wren, California Thrasher, Spotted Towhee, Wrentit, a very perky Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, and a flock of Bushtit (below).
One of the perks of birding is the other animals one might see.  An Alligator Lizard was in the middle of the road.  It is much longer and thicker than the local lizards, about 15 inches.  The lizard was in no hurry to move.  With my walking stick I encouraged it to move into the brush, as I did not want it to be run over by a bicycle.
Sticky Phacelia blooming on the north side of Islay Creek Road

Wednesday - Hazard Canyon, a 1.5 mile road/trail that intersects Manzanita and East Boundry Trails.  The canyon is narrow and has a small seasonal creek.  The birds were the same as the Islay Creek birds with a few exceptions: Swainson's Thrush, a pair of Nuttall's Woodpecker checking out a hole in a Willow tree, and two active Scrub Jay (below).   
One of the marvelous aspects of Montaña de Oro State Park is the vast majority of it is inaccessible to humans.  Poison oak, stinging nettle, and densely vegetated creeks and hills keep people on the trails, which allows birds and the park's wild animals to thrive.