Thursday, March 23, 2017

Birding Southwestern Arizona

Saguaro Cactus - White Tank Mountain Park, Arizona

My trip to Arizona was for a visit with family and a little birding.
                   View from Goat Camp Trail
White Tank Mountain Regional Park - The largest park in Maricopa County covers 29, 572 acres over 45 miles.  The range rises sharply from its base of 1400 feet to its highest peak (Barry Goldwater Peak) at 4,083 feet.  Climbing Barry Goldwater Peak was a bit beyond my capabilities.  I took the leisurely Goat Camp Trail with high hopes of seeing a few desert birds.  
Before I stepped on to the trail, I heard a Cactus Wren.  It took several minutes to locate the little darling, as there were many cacti.  Success at last.  A Cactus Wren was singing from a rather hefty Saguaro.  Although the Saguaro has a prickly nature, it plays host to a variety of animals. The Gila Woodpecker excavates nest cavities.  When the Woodpecker abandons the nest, an Elf Owl, Screech Owl, Purple Martin, Finch, or Sparrow may take up residence.  White-winged Dove, occasional visitor to the Central Coast, feast on the Saguaro fruits; Lesser Long-nosed Bat feeds on the nectar and pollen.  The Saguaro is a valuable asset to desert creatures.
The temperature was warm, 92° - 95° (33 C - 35C).  Fortunately, the birds cooperated - Curved-billed Thrasher, Costa's Hummingbird, Canyon Towhee, Gila Woodpecker (heard, not seen).  Upon leaving the park a Roadrunner sped across the road.
 Avondale Arizona - The tiny, 2oz Verdin is prolific.  Nearly every Palo Verde tree has a Verdin nest (photo taken in my brother's front yard).  It's light and cheerful song can be heard from dawn to dusk. 
While cruising through the agriculture areas of Avondale I was amazed to see an Osprey (common on Moro Bay) perched on a utility pole.   Although the Osprey possesses specialized characteristics that assist it in catching fish, they will also, on occasion, prey on small critters such as rodents and birds.  While looking at the Osprey a flock of Yellow-headed Blackbirds took flight from one of the fields.
Great-tailed Grackle (above) were abundant in the agriculture areas, especially where there were farms and dairies.  On the trip to Arizona I stopped in Blythe Calif., near the Arizona border.  Great-tailed Grackle had set up residence in palms trees that lined the parking area between two fast food establishments.  I have to admit I did leave them a few crumbs.  On the Central Coast Great-tailed Grackle can be found in the Costco parking lot near the food court.              
Estrella Mountain Regional Park - 19, 840 acres.  My brother and I walked up the Gila trail.  We saw or heard Cactus Wren, Say's Phoebe, Costa's Hummingbird, Black-tailed Gnatcatcher, Gambel's Quail, Red-tailed Hawk, and a male and female Phainopepla (below).
                        Male Phainopepla
The final Arizona bird on my journey was Arizona's state bird, a Cactus Wren.  He was boldly singing from atop a Palo Verde tree at an active Arizona rest stop on Interstate Highway 10; the fact that cars and trucks where coming and going nearby, did not faze the little singer one iota.

Back home - Today, in a Food 4 Less parking lot I saw a flock of Cedar Waxwing.  When you are out and about keep in mind, that birds can often be found in parking lots, highway Rest Areas, and around fast food restaurants.   Happy Spring Birding!